The MuseumMuseum

The Museum of Knots and Sailors' Ropework is open by appointment to those interested in this area of overlooked craftsmanship. Opened in 1996, it is crammed full of interesting items, it is the largest display on the subject in the UK.

We believe that the world should recognise the art and skill of knots and 'sailors' ropework'. Such items that have often not been valued or exhibited by museums. For many years we have collected old and recent ropework and ropeworking tools. We also have some interesting examples of the ropemaker's art. We hope to encourage greater awareness by creating this setting to properly display our collection.

Current displaysMuseum display

Currently on display are a good selection of sailors' sea chest handles, blackjacks, knives with ropework handles, walking sticks and a shaving brush all from the last century, sennit rope mats from 50 years ago many and varied examples of rope fenders and modern examples of knotwork from a dozen or so countries.

Examples of the ropemaker's art range from a 28inch circumference piece of cable from H.M.S. Victory to cordage from paper and lime bast and horse hair, as well as tapered skipping ropes and animal halters. Tools for working with rope and canvas vary from a whalebone fid to the most modern tools for splicing hi-tech yacht ropes. There is a reserve collection for those who wish to study any aspect to even greater depth. It is also possible to access Des Pawson's unique library on all aspects of knots and ropework.

The Museum in the press

The Museum of Knots and Sailors' Ropework has been featured in The Daily Telegraph and on Collectors Lot on Channel 4, together with good mentions in Wooden Boat Magazine (USA.), and Australian Sailing Magazine amongst others. This coverage has bought us visitors from all parts of the world. We believe that museums should be free, so all we ask is that you sign our visitors' book.

You can see more of our museum's collection on the Maritime Heritage East website
which covers Museums with maritime collections in East Anglia.